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Courses

GEO 1000 - Earth Science in the Cinema - 3 credits (Fall & Spring)                                                                           Requirement Designation: Physical/Life Science Exploration
Attributes: Sustainability - Limited
Components: Lecture
Earth Scientists study a wide range of provocative subjects with real-world implications for society, from evolution and extinction to natural disasters. Unsurprisingly, many of these subjects are also of interest to movie-makers in Hollywood and beyond, whose exciting thrillers sometimes do justice to the science and sometimes make a mess of it. This course explores current Earth science research themes in the context of film. Each week centers on a feature-length film and the science behind it, including presentation of the current state of the science, critique of the movies depiction of the science, and discussion of societal implications.

GEO 1040 - The World of Dinosaurs – 3 credits (Fall & Spring)
Requirement Designation: Physical/Life Science Exploration
Components: Lecture
Dinosaurs are the most celebrated fossil organisms. These remarkably diverse and successful animals inhabited every major continent, persisted more than 150 million years, and evolved numerous bizarre forms of varying body sizes. This course presents an overview of the major dinosaur groups and places them into temporal, biogeographic, and ecological context. Topics include modes of preservation, feeding adaptations, social behavior, evolution, extinction, and the origin of birds. Dinosaurs are also used as a vehicle to introduce the scientific method.

GEO 1050 - National Parks: Geology Behind the Scenery – 3 credits (Fall only)                                             Requirement Designation: Physical/Life Science Exploration
Components: Lecture
Examining and understanding the natural geologic processes that have built and shaped our country’s national parks, national monuments, national recreation areas, and national seashores.

GEO 1100 - Evolving Earth – 3 credits (Fall & Spring)                                                                                                    New curriculum beginning with 2018 catalog year                                                                                Enrollment Requirement:Recommended Prerequisites: MATH 1210 AND CHEM 1210.
Components: Lecture
This course will explore the different systems that shape our evolving Earth through time. We will consider the planets formation and composition; history of continents and oceans; and balance of life and energy. We will introduce the many systems that drive change on Earth through time: tectonics, water, carbon, life, and climate. Students will learn what distinguishes the major phases of Earths past, and will become familiar with the fundamental cycles that shape present environments and ecosystems. This course serves as context for subsequent Geology and Geophysics core curriculum.

GEO 1110 - Introduction to Earth Systems – 3 credits (Fall & Spring)                                                                      Components: Lecture
Overview of Earth materials, structure, history and processes from a systems perspective. Methods of geological observation and measurement, and their applications to problems in science and engineering. Must also register for GEO 1115.

GEO 1115 - Laboratory for Introduction to Earth Systems – 1 credit (Fall & Spring)                                           Components: Laboratory
GEO 1110 accompanying laboratory.

GEO 2100 - Reactive Earth – 3 credits (Fall & Spring)                                                                                                  New curriculum beginning with 2018 catalog year                                                                                Enrollment Requirement:Prerequisites: CHEM 1210. Co-requisites: MATH 1220.
Components: Lecture
This course will consist of an introduction to thermodynamic and geochemical concepts and their application to describe geologic processes and phenomena on and beneath the Earths surface. Students will learn fundamental chemical and mathematical approaches to quantitatively describe, interpret and predict a wide range of geochemical processes in Earth systems, and will learn the basic chemical and isotopic characteristics of materials making up the Earths lithosphere, hydrosphere, atmosphere and biosphere. Two lectures, one lab weekly.

GEO 2500 - Wasatch in the Field – 3 credits (Fall only)                                                                                                 New curriculum beginning with 2018 catalog year                                                                                 Enrollment Requirement: Recommended Co-requisites: GEO 1100.
Components: Lecture
This course will explore the Wasatch fault system and related phenomena such as landslides and groundwater hydrology using techniques from a broad array of geoscience disciplines. Investigative techniques will include geological field mapping, slope characterization, Lidar mapping, seismic and ground penetrating radar surveys, and data collection from groundwater wells. Weekly lectures will introduce methods and problems to be explored, and discuss and analyze results from the field exercises. One lecture, one lab weekly.

GEO 3010 – Geophysics – 3 credits (Spring only)
Enrollment Requirement: Prerequisites: MATH 1220 AND PHYS 2220.
Requirement Designation: Quantitative Intensive BS
Components: Laboratory/Lecture
Applications of physical principles to solid-earth dynamics and solid-earth structure, at both the scale of global tectonics and the smaller scale of subsurface exploration. Acquisition, modeling, and interpretation of seismic, gravity, magnetic, and electrical data in the context of exploration, geological engineering, and environmental problems. Two lectures, one lab weekly.

GEO 3030 - Living with Earthquakes and Volcanoes – 3 credits (Fall & Spring)                                                    Requirement Designation: International Requirement & P/L Sci Exploration
Components: Lecture
Where and why do earthquakes and volcanic eruptions occur today? How do local cultural attitudes and economic conditions affect the local consequences of earthquakes and volcanoes? The concept of plate tectonics explains global patterns of earthquakes and volcanic eruptions. Hazards, prediction, and societal impacts are considered, using examples from many countries.

GEO 3040 - Sedimentology and Stratigraphy – 4 credits (Fall only)                                                                       Enrollment Requirement: Prerequisite: GEO 3100 OR GEO 3090.
Components: Lecture / Laboratory
Sedimentary processes that erode, transport, and deposit sediments; characteristics and origins of sedimentary rocks; and principles of stratigraphy. Field trips required. Three lectures, one discussion weekly.

GEO 3050 - Petrogenesis of Igneous and Metamorphic Rocks – 4 credits                                         Enrollment Requirement: Prerequisites: (GEO 2100, CHEM 1210, AND MATH 1220) OR Instructor Consent. Recommended Co-requisites: CHEM 1220 AND GEO 3100.
Components: Lecture
Mineralogy, chemistry, texture, origin (petrogenesis) and evolution of igneous and metamorphic rocks. Relationships of magmatism and metamorphism to plate tectonics. Roles of magmatism and metamorphism in the evolution of the Earths lithosphere, oceans and atmosphere. Two lectures, one lab weekly.

GEO 3060 - Structural Geology and Tectonics – 3 credits                                                                      Enrollment Requirement: Prerequisites: (GEO 1110 OR Equivalent) AND (MATH 1060 OR Equivalent).
Requirement Designation: Quantitative Intensive BS
Components: Laboratory/Lecture
Fundamentals of rock deformation and applications to petroleum geology, mining, and geological engineering; mechanics of rock flow, fracture and folding; geometric techniques of structural analysis; introduction to tectonics. Field trips required. Two lectures, one lab weekly.

GEO 3065 - Structural Geology for Engineers – 2 credits (Fall only)                                                                       Enrollment Requirement: Prerequisites: (GEO 1110 AND 1115 OR Equivalent) & (MATH 1060 OR Equivalent)
Components: Lecture
Recognition, characterization and analysis of the geometry, kinematics, and dynamics of geologic structures formed in Earth’s crust, including reading and interpretation of geologic maps; construction of geologic cross sections; stereographic projection; geologic applications of rock mechanics.

GEO 3075 - Introduction to Geological Engineering – 2 credits (Spring only)                                                        Enrollment Requirement: Recommended Prerequiste:MATH 1220 and CHEM 1220 .
Components: Lecture
Meets with GEO 5075. Role of geology in engineering; minerals; rocks; superficial deposits; rocks and soils as engineering materials; hydrologic influences; geological engineering aspects of underground excavations, slopes, reservoirs, and dam sites. Geologic exploration of engineering sites; rock mass characterization per ISRM Suggested Methods on rock cores and outcrops; rock mass classifications and their use in empirical design. Stereonets, geometric constructions and slope stability calculations with stereonets. Includes field trips, labs and a design experience.

GEO 3100 - Dynamic Earth – 3 credits (Fall & Spring)                                                                                                   New curriculum beginning with 2018 catalog year                                                                                Enrollment Requirement: Prerequisites: GEO 2100. Pre/Co-requisites: GEO 2500.
Components: Lecture
This course will focus on the application of continuum mechanics to describe geologic processes and phenomena. We will cover a range of diverse topics spanning the inner and outer Earth including: elasticity, tectonics, heat flow, gravity, electromagnetism, fluid dynamics, faulting, seismology, surface processes, and geological hazards. Students will learn fundamental physical and mathematical approaches to quantitatively describe, interpret, and predict a broad range of dynamic processes in Earth systems. Two lectures, one interactive workshop weekly.

GEO 3180 - Paleobiology – 3 credits (Spring only)                                                                                                         Components: Laboratory/Lecture
Morphology, taxonomy, evolution, and stratigraphic distribution of fossil animals and plants. Two lectures, one lab weekly.

GEO 3250 - Geology of Utah – 3 credits (Fall only)                                                                                                      Enrollment Requirement: Prerequisites: GEO 1100 OR GEO 1110.
Requirement Designation: Physical/Life Science Exploration
Components: Lecture
Physiography and geology of the Utah region. Development of geological features of Utah through time. Origin of rock sequences, economic products, landscape evolution, and mountain building from the perspective of plate tectonics. Evolution of geological exploration and geological thought to the present time.

GEO 3300 - The Water Planet – 3 credits (Spring only)                                                                                                 Requirement Designation: Physical/Life Science Exploration
Components: Lecture
Why is Paris warmer than Boston in the winter? Is religion thicker than water? Is groundwater becoming deeper and saltier? This course will examine the physical and chemical properties of water in the context of societal problems and needs, and the role of water in shaping global climate and civilization. Important properties of water will be explored to understand topical issues. Class project is required. For non-science majors. Field trip.

GEO 3368 - Energy Choices for the 21st Century – 3 credits                                                                           Cross-listed:ENVST 3368 GEOG 3368 
Enrollment Requirement: Prerequisites: Knowledge of Basic Algebra (Recommended).
Requirement Designation: Physical/Life Science Exploration
Components: Lecture
Meets with GEOG 5368 and GEO 5368. Graduate students should enroll in GEOG 5368 or GEO 5368 and will be held to higher standards and/or more work. This class is designed to give students an introduction to the critical energy issues facing our planet, with a focus on controversial topics and issues in Utah. These will include: hydraulic fracking (fracking), offshore oil and gas development, oil shale and tar sand development, nuclear energy (with particular regard to the proposed Blue Castle nuclear plant in Green River and storage of radioactive waste in Utah), wind, solar and geothermal energy (again, with emphasis on Utah), other renewable technologies, the Smartgrid difficulties in commercializing new energy technologies, air pollution, transportation choices, energy policy development, and global issues including population dynamics, climate change, carbon management, water resources, the Law of Unintended Consequences, and tipping points. A number of outstanding guest lecturers will provide expertise in their respective fields.

GEO 3400 - Computational and Numerical Methods in Applied Geology – 3 credits (Fall only)
Enrollment Requirement: Prerequisites:
MATH 1210.
Components: Laboratory/Lecture
Computer and numerical methods for solving applied geoscience problems. Develops the computational skills required to solve problems in landscape evolution, geologic hazards, and Earth systems. Meets computer programming requirement for Geology and Geological Engineering majors.

GEO 3670 - Science Communication and Mentoring Skill for the Next Generation – 3 credits            Cross-listed:ATMOS 3670BIOL 3670 CHEM 3670 PHYS 3670 
Requirement Designation: Upper Division Communication/Writing
Components: Laboratory/Lecture
The ability to communicate effectively to peers, professionals and the public is critical to being successful in any scientific field. Science addresses questions that are integral to some of today’s most pressing political and social issues including health care, environmental quality, technology and education. Therefore, scientists must be able to place their work in a context that is relevant and accessible to a broad audience. This course is designed to teach students how to communicate complex interdisciplinary scientific concepts through written and oral mediums and to prepare them to communicate successfully with peers, researchers, faculty, students, and future employers. The course consists of a 2-hour class session and a 3-hour weekly communication and teaching lab in a K-12 school.

GEO 3800 - The Oceans – 3 credits (Fall only)                                                                                                            Requirement Designation: Physical/Life Science Exploration
Attributes: Sustainability - Limited
Components: Lecture
This is an interdisciplinary course that explores all aspects of the ocean including origins and evolution of ocean basins, physical and chemical properties of seawater, and links between circulation, currents, and climate, coastal processes, human interactions, and sustainability of ocean systems. Students will develop an oceanic perspective of earth systems, examine oceanic processes and the relationships between the ocean and other earth systems, and appreciate how the oceans influences societies and how humans affect the ocean.

GEO 3900 - Undergraduate Research – 1-3 credits (All Semesters)                                                                         Total Completions Allowed: 2 Total Units Allowed: 6
Components: Independent Study
Student engages in research under the guidance of specific faculty advisor. At the conclusion of the project, a written report, technical poster or other deliverable (e.g., curated sample collection) is required.

GEO 4060 - Structural Geology and Tectonics – 4 credits                                                                      Enrollment Requirement: Prerequisites: GEO 3100 OR Equivalent.
Components: Lecture
Structural geology is concerned with describing and quantifying strain (deformation) observed in rocks and relating that deformation to tectonic stresses (forces) in the past. In this course, students will learn to recognize and describe a wide variety of tectonic structures and interpret the geologic history of rocks and regions based on your observations and measurements at a variety of scales. By the end of this course, students should be able to: a) characterize the composition and geometry of rock bodies, with an emphasis on geologic map and cross-section interpretation. b) Explain the fundamentals of stress, strain, and rheology and how they pertain to rock deformation. c) Relate rock deformation to plate tectonics. And d) articulate the fundamental principles of structural geology as they pertain to studying Earth processes and human interactions with these processes. Students will achieve this by collecting, analyzing, and interpreting geological data in field, lab, and classroom settings. Field trips required. Two lectures, one lab weekly.

GEO 4100 - Petrography and Petrogenesis – 3 credits                                                                            Enrollment Requirement: Prerequisites: (GEO 3080 OR GEO 3090) AND GEO 2100 OR Equivalent.
Components: Laboratory/Lecture
Identification of minerals in igneous and metamorphic rocks in flat-stage thin sections by optical means. Textural relations between constituent minerals in rocks and their interpretation. Laboratories consist of studying rock slices in thin section using a petrographic microscope. Two lectures, one lab weekly.

GEO 4500 - Field Methods – 3 credits (Spring only)                                                                                                      Enrollment Requirement: Prerequisites: (GEO 1110, GEO 3060, GEO 3080, GEO 3090, AND GEO 5760) OR (GEO 1100, 2100, 2500, AND 3100).
Requirement Designation: Upper Division Communication/Writing
Components: Field Work/Lecture
Practical field skills applicable to geological, geoengineering, and environmental studies developed through weekly field exercises in the Wasatch Front area. Results presented orally in class and/or in written reports targeted to a variety of potential users, including professional colleagues, government agencies, and the general public.

GEO 4510 - Field Geology - Part 1 – 2 credits (Summer only)                                                                                     Enrollment Requirement: Prerequisite:GEO 4500.
Components: Field Work
Geologic mapping and other types of field data collection in geologically varied areas in Utah and/or adjacent states, with applications to resource evaluation, geological hazards, and geological engineering. Includes two weeks of field work at various off-campus sites and preparation of a professional technical report.

GEO 4520 - Field Geology - Part 2 – 2 credits (Summer only)                                                                                      Components: Field Trip
Builds on skills acquired in Field Geology Part 1 with geologic mapping in geologically more complex terrains and quantitative analysis of 3-dimensional field data. Includes two weeks of field work at various off-campus sites in Utah and/or adjacent states and preparation of a professional technical report.

GEO 4970 - Senior Thesis – 3 credits (All Semesters)                                                                                                    Total Completions Allowed: 2 Total Units Allowed: 6
Enrollment Requirement: Prerequisites: Minimum GPA of 2.70 in all GEO and Allied Science Courses; Minimum of 12 Semester Hours of Credit in GEO Courses Completed; AND Enrollment at the Discretion of the Student’s Principal Research Advisor.
Components: Independent Study
Student engages in an original research project under the guidance of a specific advisor. It is the responsibility of the student to identify the faculty advisor and receive his/her permission before enrolling in the course. At the conclusion of the project, a written thesis (prepared in scientific style) is required.

GEO 4999 - Honors Thesis/Project – 3 credits (Fall & Spring)                                                                                    Attributes: Honors Course
Components: Honors Thesis Project
Restricted to students in the Honors program working on an Honors degree.

GEO 5060 - Global Geophysics – 3 credits (Spring Even Years)                                                                                   Enrollment Requirement: Recommended Prerequisite:MATH 2250 and PHYS 2220.
Components: Laboratory/Lecture
Structure and dynamics of the Earth. Observations and deductions about the crust, mantle, and core. Lithospheric plates and their motions at present and in the past. Energy balances within the Earth. Two lectures, one lab weekly. Meets with GEO 6061.

GEO 5065 - Advanced Structural Geology – 3 credits                                                                              Enrollment Requirement: Prerequisite:GEO 3060
Components: Lecture
Meets with GEO 6060. Quantitative analysis of earth structures including two-and three-dimensional geometrical modeling, processes of brittle and ductile deformation, and response of rocks to static and dynamic stress fields. Applications to regional tectonics and landscape evolution, earthquake mechanics, hydrology-petroleum geology, engineering geology and mineral exploration. Two lectures, one lab per week.

GEO 5070 - Tectonics of Orogenic Belts – 3 credits                                                                                  Enrollment Requirement: Recommended Prerequisite:GEO 3060.
Components: Lecture
Tectonic processes at active plate margins and their products in the geologic record. Focuses on current topics in tectonics research including interaction of solid-Earth processes with climate and landscape development. Case histories drawn from around the world. Meets with GEO 6070, GEO 7070.

GEO 5075 - Introduction to Geological Engineering – 2 credits                                                            Enrollment Requirement: Prerequisite:MATH 1220 , CHEM 1220 .
Components: Laboratory/Lecture
Meets with GEO 3075. Role of geology in engineering; minerals; rocks; superficial deposits; rocks and soils as engineering materials; hydrologic influences; geological engineering aspects of underground excavations, slopes, reservoirs, and dam sites. Geologic exploration of engineering sites; rock mass characterization per ISRM Suggested Methods on rock cores and outcrops; rock mass classifications and their use in empirical design. Stereonets, geometric constructions and slope stability calculations with stereonets. Includes field trips, labs and a design experience. Additional work required of graduate students. Meets with GEO 3075.

GEO 5120 - Geochemical Thermodynamics and Transport – 3 credits (Fall Odd Years)                                    Enrollment Requirement: Recommended Prerequisite:GEO 3090 and GEO 4100.
Components: Laboratory/Lecture
Principles of geochemical thermodynamics and kinetics with application to solid, fluid, and gas phases and solutions of geologic interest. Fundamentals of geochemical reaction and transport with applications to processes of fluid-rock interaction in the Earth’s crust. Two lectures, one lab weekly. Meets with GEO 6120, 7120.

GEO 5150 - Geological Engineering Design – 3 credits (Spring only)                                                                         Enrollment Requirement: Prerequisites: (CVEEN 3310 AND GEO 5350) AND CVEEN 5305 OR MG EN 5150. Recommended Prerequisite: Completed or concurrently enrolled in GEO 4500.
Requirement Designation: Quantitative Intensive BS
Components: Lecture
Comprehensive design experience in the field of geo-engineering, starting from the design of a site investigation and its cost estimate, and continuing with the analysis of site investigation data, and their use in student’s term project. Reliability-based design levels I, II and III, AASHTO LRFD as an example of design code. Slope stabilization methods, foundations on unstable slopes. Students prepare geotechnical and design reports, along with drawings in a design studio setting. Design process including the Environmental Impact Statement/Assessment, project formats. 2 2-hour lectures/labs with term project reviews or class design projects.

GEO 5170 - Geohazards and Engineering Geomorphology – 3 credits (Fall Odd Years)                                      Enrollment Requirement: Prerequisites: GEO 3100 AND PHYS 2210.
Components: Lecture
Meets with GEO 6170. This course presents an introduction to geological hazards, their essential processes and driving factors, impact on built environments, and what can be done about it all. Special attention is given to hazard identification and evaluation through applied engineering geomorphology, and toward introducing underlying geomorphological principles of the different systems. Topics addressed include: mass wasting (e.g. rockfall, rock avalanches, landslides, debris and earth flows), earthquakes (site effects, liquefaction and slope stability), alpine geohazards (glacial and periglacial), and Fluvial processes such as flooding and erosion. Course meets twice per week for lecture and two mandatory full-day excursions plus one virtual field trip.

GEO 5180 - Paleoecology – 3 credits (Fall only)                                                                                                             Enrollment Requirement: Prerequisites:GEO 3180. Recommended Co-Requisites: GEO 3040.
Components: Lecture
Ecologic approach to the interpretation of fossil populations, communities, and the global biosphere throughout geological time. One one-week field trip. Meets with GEO 6180, GEO 7180.

GEO 5200 - Depositional Environments – 3 credits (Spring Even Years)                                                                 Enrollment Requirement: Prerequisites: GEO 3090 OR GEO 3100.
Components: Lecture
Meets with GEO 6200 and 7200. Physical and chemical factors related to deposition and lithification of sedimentary material; significant aspects of major sedimentary environments, with emphasis on interpretation and recognition. Three lectures weekly.

GEO 5210 - Seismology I: Tectonophysics and Elastic Waves – 3 credits (Fall only)                                           Enrollment Requirement: Prerequisite:GEO 3010 , MATH 2210 . Recommended Prerequisite: MATH 3150 .
Components: Lecture
Continuum mechanics of Earth materials, tensor formulation of deformation and stress, fracture, flow, and rheology of the Earth materials; constitutive relationships; wave propagation, wave equations, reflection/refraction, travel time determinations. Introduction to analytic problem solving using computer tools. Meets with GEO 6211.

GEO 5220 - Seismology II: Seismic Imaging – 3 credits (Spring only)                                                                        Enrollment Requirement: Prerequisites: GEO 5210.
Components: Laboratory/Lecture
Meets with GEO 6222. Seismic imaging using both passive and active seismic sources with applications to both large and small scale problems. Introduction to seismic tomography, receiver function analysis, refraction and reflection imaging, seismic interferometry, and other imaging techniques. Field and laboratory exercises.

GEO 5240 - Electromagnetic Methods – 3 credits (Spring only)                                                                                 Enrollment Requirement: Recommended Prerequisites: MATH 3150 and PHYCS 2220.
Components: Lecture
General concepts of electromagnetic field behavior. Electromagnetic properties of rocks. Direct current methods, natural-field electromagnetic methods, magnetotelluric field, numerical modeling, magnetotelluric survey methods. Controlled source electromagnetic methods, electromagnetic sounding and profiling. Computer simulation and interpretation of electromagnetic geophysical data. Meets with GEO 6240.

GEO 5250 - Inversion Theory and Applications – 3 credits (Fall only)                                                                    Enrollment Requirement: Recommended Prerequisites:MATH 3150 and PHYS 2220.
Components: Lecture
Forward and inverse problems in geophysics. Uniqueness and instability in the solution of inverse problems. Ill-posed problems and methods of their solution. The regularization method. Linearized inversion technique. Principles of discrete inverse theory. Nonlinear inversion technique. Gradient type methods, regularized Newton, and conjugate gradient methods. Computer simulation of geophysical inverse problem solution using regularization method. Meets with GEO 6250, GEO 7250.

GEO 5265 - The Magnetic Earth – 3 credits (Fall only)                                                                                                Enrollment Requirement: Prerequisites:GEO 3010 and GEO 3100.
Components: Lecture
This lecture, lab, and discussion course will introduce students to the fundamentals and applications of geomagnetism, paleomagnetism, and rock & mineral magnetism in the context of Earth System Science. Students will gain experience reading, discussing, reviewing, and presenting scientific literature, as well as writing grant proposals and data reports. The course also consists of a series of problem sets, which will be focused on a class project in which students will learn a variety of rock and paleomagnetic analytical techniques by generating their own data in the Utah Paleomagnetic Center and applying a variety of rock magnetic and paleomagnetic data reduction and synthesis techniques. The exact topic of the class project is TBD, but could include applying mineral magnetism to: magnetostratigraphy & stratigraphic correlation (in igneous, marine, and terrestrial systems); monitoring air pollution; geobiology; or paleoprecipitation records. The course is intended for graduate students and upper-level undergraduate students. It is assumed that students have completed GEO 3010 (Geophysics) and their general physics requirements. Completion of Earth Materials II, Structural Geology, or both is a bonus, but is not required.

GEO 5270 - Geomorphology – 3 credits (Fall Even Years)                                                                                           Enrollment Requirement: Prerequisite: GEO 3100.
Components: Lecture
Study of processes driving the dynamic form and evolution of Earths surface, focusing on the mechanics of physical and chemical interactions between ice, water, air, rock, sediment and soil. This course provides an overview of Earth surface processes and the landforms they produce. Topics include weathering and erosion, glaciers and periglacial processes, hillslopes and mass movements, earthquakes, and fluvial systems. Two lectures and one exercise period per week; one mandatory full-day field trip. Meets with GEO 6270.

GEO 5320 - Signal Processing in the Geosciences – 3 credits (Fall only)                                                                Enrollment Requirement: Prerequisites: MATH 2250. Recommended Prerequisites: MATH 3160.
Components: Lecture
Analysis of linear time-invariant systems and the processing of continuous and digital signals. Topics include: Laplace transforms, Fourier Transforms, transfer functions, convolution and correlation, sampling issues, filter design, spectral analysis, and time-frequency analysis. Meets with GEO 6320, 7320.

GEO 5330 - Seismic Sources – 3 credits                                                                                                        Enrollment Requirement: Recommended Prerequisites: GEO 5210 and MATH 3150.
Components: Lecture
Physics of earthquakes and related sources. Topics include stress, strain, faulting, focal mechanisms, moment tensors, magnitudes and energy release, source kinematics, event detection and location, source discrimination, types of earthquakes, and case studies of notable earthquakes. Meets with GEO 6330 and 7330.

GEO 5350 - Groundwater – 3 credits (Fall only)                                                                                                            Enrollment Requirement: Prerequisites: MATH 1220.
Attributes: Sustainability - Limited
Components: Lecture
Fundamental physics and mathematical models of ground-water flow with selected applications in the earth sciences and engineering. Specific topics include Darcy’s Law, fluid storage, equations of flow, aquifer evaluation methods, and the role of ground water in geotechnical and geologic problems. Meets with GEO 6350.

GEO 5360 - Fluid Mechanics of Earth Materials – 3 credits (Spring Even Years)                                                   Enrollment Requirement: Prerequisites: MATH 2250 OR Instructor Consent.
Components: Lecture
Derivation of the Navier-Stokes equations of fluid motion and momentum transport. Application to fundamental problems of Earth science and engineering design. Two lectures, one lab weekly. Meets with GEO 6360.

GEO 5368 - Energy Choices for the 21st Century – 3 credits                                                                           Cross-listed:GEOG 5368 
Enrollment Requirement: Prerequisites: Knowledge of Basic Algebra (Recommended).
Requirement Designation: Physical/Life Science Exploration
Components: Lecture
Meets with ENVST 3368, GEOG 3368 and GEO 3368. Graduate students should enroll in GEOG 5368 or GEO 5368 and will be held to higher standards and/or more work. This class is designed to give students an introduction to the critical energy issues facing our planet, with a focus on controversial topics and issues in Utah. These will include: hydraulic fracking (fracking), offshore oil and gas development, oil shale and tar sand development, nuclear energy (with particular regard to the proposed Blue Castle nuclear plant in Green River and storage of radioactive waste in Utah), wind, solar and geothermal energy (again, with emphasis on Utah), other renewable technologies, the Smartgrid difficulties in commercializing new energy technologies, air pollution, transportation choices, energy policy development, and global issues including population dynamics, climate change, carbon management, water resources, the Law of Unintended Consequences, and tipping points. A number of outstanding guest lecturers will provide expertise in their respective fields.

GEO 5385 - Introduction to Groundwater Modeling – 1 credit (Spring only)
Enrollment Requirement: Prerequisites:
GEO 5350 OR Equivalent.
Components: Laboratory
Meets with GEO 6385. Fundamentals of groundwater flow and transport modeling will be introduced in the computer laboratory using hands-on exercises performed with the Groundwater Modeling System (GMS) and the U.S.G.S. groundwater models MODFLOW, MODPATH, and FEMWATER. By the end of the 5-week short-course, each student should understand the assumptions and limitations of the modeling approach and be able to create, run and interpret the results of 2-D groundwater flow and transport simulations using GMS. Topics covered include: defining mathematical/numerical equivalents to real world problems, finite difference method, finite element method and sensitivity studies.

GEO 5390 - Solute Transport and Subsurface Remediation – 3 credits (Spring only)                                         Enrollment Requirement: Prerequisites: GEO 5350. Co-requisites: GEO 5385.
Components: Lecture
Meets with GEO 6390. Application of principles of ground water hydrology and contaminant chemistry in the quantification and characterization of physical, chemical and biological processes influencing subsurface hazardous waste. Topics include: quantification of advective-dispersive transport of conservative and reactive solutes, transport in granular and fractured media, application of environmental regulations and toxicological parameters, design of air-stripping, carbon adsorption, soil vapor extraction, surfactant enhanced extraction, bio-venting, bio-augmentation, solidification, and capture systems. Class project involves design of remediation system for a hypothetical site.

GEO 5420 - Vertebrate Paleontology and Evolution – 3 credits                                                                     Cross-listed:BIOL 5401 
Components: Lecture
Survey of the diversity of fossil vertebrates, with emphasis on skeletal morphology and systematics. Additional topics include taphonomy, functional morphology, origins of major groups (clades), tempo and mode of evolutionary change, and mass extinctions, as well as stratigraphic and biogeographic distributions viewed in the context of plate tectonics. One field trip. Meets with GEO 6420.

GEO 5450 - Ore Genesis and Mineral Exploration – 3 credits (Fall Odd Years)                                                      Enrollment Requirement: Recommended Prerequisite: GEO 3080 or GEO 3100.
Components: Laboratory/Lecture
Ore-forming processes, magma differentiation, hydrothermal systems, sedimentation and metamorphism. Hand-specimen and thin-section examination of fresh and altered host rocks. Microscope study of ore minerals with polished-surface preparations. Identification, textures, structures, associations, and sequence of mineral deposition with problem-solving philosophy. Exploration algorithm, design, and execution of geologic programs and applications of geologic principles in regional minerals search, including geochemical, geophysical, geological, and engineering methods. Field trips in Utah and adjacent states. Two lectures, one lab weekly. Meets with GEO 6451, 7451.

GEO 5470 - Stable Isotope Biogeochemistry and Ecology – 3 credits                                                           Cross-listed:BIOL 5470 
Enrollment Requirement: Prerequisite: Instructor’s consent.
Components: Lecture
A lecture course on the principles of stable isotope biogeochemistry and ecology as applied to biological environments and of the contributions of stable isotope approaches to addressing ecological phenomena from cellular through global levels. this course emphasizes a critical-thinking focus on ecological and biogeochemical processes and patterns at local to global scales. Student performance is evaluated through a combination of data analysis, writing, and oral/written communications. Meets with BIOL 7473 in Fall semester. It is recommended that BIOL 3410 is completed prior to or concurrently with taking this course.

GEO 5473 - Stable Isotope Ecology – 3 credits (Summer only)                                                                                  Enrollment Requirement: Prerequisites:GEO 5660 OR BIOL 5495 OR BIOL 5460.
Components: Lecture
Short course (2 weeks). A multi-lecturer course describing the principles of sable isotope biogeochemistry as applied to biological environments, geological and marine processes, climate reconstruction, anthropological and biomedical studies, and of the contributions of stable isotope approaches to addressing ecological phenomena from cellular through global levels.

GEO 5475 - Stable Isotope Biogeochemistry in Ecology Laboratory – 3 credits                           Components: Laboratory/Lecture
One-hour lecture and two 3-hour laboratory sessions per week. A laboratory course introducing principles of isotope ratio mass spectrometry and laser spectroscopy. Laboratory experiments and field observations are designed to promote critical thinking and hypothesis testing associated with environmental research. Technical experiences include training on isotope ratio mass spectrometers, laser spectrometers, elemental analyzers, has chromatograph mass spectrometers, infrared gas analyzers, and vacuum systems. Two mandatory field trips. The primary focus of the combined lab-field experience is to provide students with experiences that include experimental design, methodology, data acquisition and analysis, report writing, and proposal preparation.

GEO 5500 - Field Methods – 3 credits (Spring only)                                                                                                      Enrollment Requirement: Prerequisites: (GEO 1110, GEO 3060, GEO 3080 AND GEO 3090) OR (GEO 1100, 2100, 2500 AND 3100).
Components: Field Work/Lecture
Meets with GEO 4500. Practical field skills applicable to geological, geoengineering, and environmental studies developed through weekly field exercises in the Wasatch Front area. Results presented orally in class and/or in written reports targeted to a variety of potential users, including professional colleagues, government agencies, and the general public.

GEO 5510 - Introduction to Petroleum Systems: PICP 1a – 1.5 credits (Fall only)                                               Enrollment Requirement: Prerequisite:GEO 3040 or equivalent.
Components: Lecture
Meets with GEO 6510. This entry level course in the Petroleum Industry Career Path (PICP), with an introduction to petroleum systems components including source, reservoir, seal, trap, and generation-migration-accumulation processes. Class discussions, presentations, and readings revolve around a required weekend field trip to investigate outcrop and subcrop expressions and field relationships of an active petroleum system (e.g., the Sevier foreland basin and overthrust belt). Industry experts and guest speakers are an integral part of the course. Projects will cover a diverse industry dataset (outcrop observations, seismic, well-log, core, bulk and organic geochemical, and outcrop data) to advise on exploration strategies in both established and frontier basins. Offered first half of fall semester.

GEO 5520 - Introduction to Petroleum Systems: PICP 1b – 1.5 credits (Fall only)                                               Enrollment Requirement: Prerequisite:GEO 5510 .
Components: Lecture
Meets with GEO 6520. A continuation of GEO 5510, this Petroleum Industry Career Path (PICP) course expands on lessons learned in PICP 1a to include a more comprehensive evaluation of hydrocarbon exploration and production methods. Industry datasets provide real-world experience with typical petroleum datasets and their associated challenges. Includes an introduction to borehole tools and well log interpretations. Integration of multidisciplinary techniques is emphasized and both conventional and unconventional resources are examined. Course includes a field trip and quest speakers from the petroleum industry. This applied course will also address business and engineering aspects of hydrocarbon exploration and production. Offered second half of fall semester, following PICP 1a.

GEO 5525 - Geologic Interpretation of Seismic Reflection Data: PICP 2a – 1.5 credits (Spring only)               Enrollment Requirement: Prerequisite: GEO 5520.
Components: Lecture
Meets with GEO 6525. This third course in the Petroleum Industry Career Path (PICP) covers the basic principles of geologic interpretation of seismic reflection data, including the basics of acquisition and processing, and potential pitfalls that all seismic interpreters should consider. Laboratory and in-class exercises will use real petroleum industry software and datasets - including both 2D paper lines and experience with 3D workstation data - and emphasize practical applications of theories introduces in class. Labs will cover integration of outcrop and well-log data with seismic data (including synthetics), mapping and contouring techniques, and fundamentals of seismic stratigraphy, all with direct implications for hydrocarbon exploration. Offered first half of spring semester.

GEO 5530 - Petroleum Systems Capstone: PICP 2b – 1.5 credits (Spring only)                                                     Enrollment Requirement: Prerequisite: GEO 5525.
Components: Lecture
Meets with GEO 6530. This course presents an open-ended petroleum exploration scenario where students must apply the methods and approaches encountered in previous PICP offerings. Industry-standard software will be used in a collaborative, team-based working environment to identify and characterize prospects from an industry dataset. Students will rely on their fundamental knowledge of geology and geophysics to generate prospects and will investigate the impact of (1) hydrocarbon in place estimation methods and other reservoir engineering concepts, (2) risk evaluation, and (3) economics, land issues and legal implications of evaluating petroleum plays and prospects. Offered second half of spring semester.

GEO 5565 - Digital Mapping and GIS in the Geosciences – 2 credits (Fall only)                                                   Enrollment Requirement: Recommended Prerequisites: (GEO 1110 AND 1115) OR GEO 1100 OR Equivalent.
Components: Lecture
Meets with GEO 6565. Introduction of coordinate systems and projections, digital elevation data and mapping. Analysis of geologic and hydrologic systems and data within a GIS context. Additional work will be required of students registered for 6565.

GEO 5650 - Hydrology and Water Resources – 3 credits (Fall only)                                                                   Components: Lecture
As the core course in the Hydrology and water Resources Graduate program, this course serves to integrate disciplinary expertise from participating units across campus. The course is organized around four thematic modules with three topics each. Each module covers fundamentals and introduces observations / modeling, current/ recent knowledge. At the conclusion of each module there is an integrated activity focused on application/ integration around related western water issues, decision making, and policy.

GEO 5660 - Geochemistry – 3 credits (Fall only)                                                                                                           Enrollment Requirement: Recommended Prerequisites: CHEM 1220.
Components: Lecture
Geochemistry of the Earth and Earth processes, low temperature geochemistry, applications of thermodynamics to geologic problems. Meets with GEO 6660, 7660.

GEO 5665 - Computational Paleophysiology – 3 credits                                                                                  Cross-listed:BIOL 5665 
Enrollment Requirement: Prerequisite:CHEM 1210, MATH 1210, AND PHYS 2210.
Requirement Designation: Quantitative Intensive BS
Components: Field Work
This course examines the methods scientists use to ‘put flesh on the bones’ of extinct animals. It is designed to give students the quantitative tools needed to build computational models that reconstruct the biology of extinct organisms as well as to teach them how to frame hypotheses, select appropriate methods for investigating hypotheses, analyze data, write a scientific paper, and communicate findings as an oral presentation. the class emphasizes project-based learning. The course includes a field trip and the dates are TBA. Instructor’s permission is required. Click the course name above for application information. For questions contact Biology Advising 581-6244. It is recommended that CHEM 1210, MATH 1210, PHYS 2210, BIOL 3310, BIOL 3320 be completed prior to or concurrently with this course.

GEO 5670 - Isotope Tracers in Earth Science – 3 credits (Fall Even Years)                                                             Enrollment Requirement: Recommended Prerequisites: GEO 5660.
Components: Discussion/Lecture
Principles of stable isotope fractionation. Overview and interpretation of stable isotope variations in the Earth’s lithosphere, hydrosphere, biosphere, and atmosphere. Applications of isotopes to track and evaluate geologic, physical, geochemical, and geobiochemical processes in and on the Earth. Two lectures, one lab weekly. Meets with GEO 6670.

GEO 5675 - Paleoclimate Reconstruction – 3 credits                                                                           Components: Lecture
Meets with GEO 6675. Paleoclimatology, the study of past climate states and climate change, is fundamental to understanding and predicting recent and future changes in Earth’s climate. This course will explore how paleoclimatologists reconstruct and understand past climate through the investigation of biological, hydrological, and sedimentalogical archives. The course combines lectures with reading and discussion of the recent literature, and will emphasize informed, critical evaluation of paleoclimate data and illustration of multi-disciplinary approaches to significant problems in contemporary paleoclimatology. Although no formal prerequisites are required, introductory-level familiarity with inorganic and organic chemistry, biology, and calculus will benefit students in the class.

GEO 5680 - The Carbon Cycle: Past, Present, Future – 3 credits                                                      Components: Lecture
Meets with GEO 6680. This course will review the carbon cycle in the context of its global role as a fundamental biogeochemical cycle. We will explore its links to Earth history, evolution, climate, surface processes, the sedimentary record, oceanography, ecology, energy, human society, and the future habitability of our planet. We will evaluate how the carbon cycle operated before human intervention, how it has changed in recent centuries, and how it might change in the future.

GEO 5690 - Environmental Chemodynamics (Fall only)                                                                                             Enrollment Requirement: Prerequisites: CHEM 1210, 1220 or consent of instructor.
Components: Lecture
If you’ve ever wondered about odd contamination issues like: why polar bears accumulate PCBs; why its so difficult to say whether an oil spill has actually been cleaned up; and why is mercury everywhere but becomes problem only in certain places, then this course may be for you. This course provides a working knowledge for prediction of the partitioning of anthropogenic organic and inorganic chemicals in aquatic and subsurface environments and is designed to allow participation by students from a wide variety of backgrounds including geoscience, environmental engineering and public health. Students are assumed to have had a year of general chemistry. We will briefly review the basics of organic and physical chemistry at appropriate places in the course. While the course style accommodates many backgrounds, it is not a slacker course; you will learn a great deal, and you will emerge with working tools to predict contaminant concentrations in the environment based on their molecular structures and basic characteristics.

GEO 5900 - Internship – 1-3 credits (All Semesters)                                                                                                     Total Completions Allowed: 6 Total Units Allowed: 18
Components: Practicum
Student internships and work experience in geoscience related jobs. This cooperative education program is available to GEO majors.

GEO 5910 - Hydrology and Professional Development Seminar – 2 credits (Spring only)                                 Components: Seminar
This seminar course is the second on two new courses that constitute the common core for the recently approved Hydrology and Water Resources Graduate Certificate. Six high profile lectures from visiting and local researchers on water cycle dynamics will alternate with professional development activities designed for training leaders in Hydrology and Water Resource management and research.

GEO 5920 - Special Topics - .5-5 credits (All Semesters)                                                                                              Total Completions Allowed: 8 Total Units Allowed: 24
Components: Special Topics
Investigation of specific geoscience problems. See GEO 6920 for topic areas.

GEO 6060 - Advanced Structural Geology – 3 credits                                                                              Enrollment Requirement: Recommended Prerequisite:GEO 3060.
Components: Laboratory/Lecture
Meets with GEO 5065. Quantitative analysis of Earth structures including two- and three-dimensional geometrical modeling, processes of brittle and ductile deformation, and response of rocks to static and dynamic stress fields. Applications to regional tectonics and landscape evolution, earthquake mechanics, hydrology-petroleum geology, engineering geology and mineral exploration. Two lectures, one lab per week.

GEO 6061 - Global Geophysics – 3 credits (Spring Even Years)                                                                                  Enrollment Requirement: Prerequisite: Graduate standing required.
Components: Laboratory/Lecture
Meets with GEO 5060; additional work required of graduate students. See GEO 5060 for course description.

GEO 6070 - Tectonics of Orogenic Belt – 3 credits                                                                                    Enrollment Requirement: Prerequisite: Graduate standing required.
Components: Lecture
Meets with GEO 5070; additional work required of graduate students. See GEO 5070 for course description.

GEO 6120 - Geochemical Thermodynamics and Transport – 3 credits (Fall Odd Years)                                    Enrollment Requirement: Prerequisite: Graduate standing required.
Components: Laboratory/Lecture
Meets with GEO 5120 and GEO 7120; additional work required of graduate students. See GEO 5120 for course description.

GEO 6150 - Geological Engineering Design – 3 credits (Spring only)                                                                        Enrollment Requirement: Prerequisites: Graduate Standing Required.
Components: Lecture
Meets with GEO 5150. Comprehensive design experience in the field of geo-engineering, starting from the design of a site investigation and its cost estimate, and continuing with the analysis of site investigation data, and their use in students’ term project. Reliability-based design levels I, II and III, AASHTO LRFD as an example of design code. Slope stabilization methods, foundations on unstable slopes. Students prepare geotechnical and design reports, along with drawings in a design studio setting. Design process including the Environmental Impact Statement/Assessment, project formats. 2 2-hour lectures/labs with term project reviews or class design projects.

GEO 6170 - Geohazards and Engineering Geomorphology – 3 credits (Fall Odd Years)                                     Enrollment Requirement: Prerequisites: Graduate Standing Required.
Components: Lecture
Meets with GEO 5170. This course presents an introduction to geological hazards, their essential processes and driving factors, impact on built environments, and what can be done about it all. Special attention is given to hazard identification and evaluation through applied engineering geomorphology, and toward introducing underlying geomorphological principles of the different systems. Topics addressed include: mass wasting (e.g. rockfall, rock avalanches, landslides, debris and earth flows), earthquakes (site effects, liquefaction and slope stability), alpine geohazards (glacial and periglacial), and Fluvial processes such as flooding and erosion. Course meets twice per week for lecture and two mandatory full-day excursions plus one virtual field trip.

GEO 6180 – Paleoecology – 3 credits (Fall only)                                                                                                            Enrollment Requirement: Prerequisite: Graduate standing required.
Components: Lecture
Meets with GEO 5180 and GEO 7180; additional work required of graduate students. See GEO 5180 for course description.

GEO 6200 - Depositional Environments – 3 credits (Spring Even Years)                                                                Cross-listed: GEO 7200
Enrollment Requirement: Prerequisites: M.S. Students AND Graduate Standing Required.
Components: Lecture
Graduate standing required. Meets with GEO 5200; additional work required of graduate students. Physical and chemical factors related to deposition and lithification of sedimentary material; significant aspects of major sedimentary environments, with emphasis on interpretation and recognition. Three lectures weekly.

GEO 6210 - Seismology I – 3 credits (Fall only)                                                                                                             Enrollment Requirement: Prerequisite: Graduate standing required.
Components: Lecture
Meets with GEO 5210; additional work required of graduate students. See GEO 5210 for course description.

GEO 6220 - Seismic Imaging – 3 credits (Spring only)                                                                                      Enrollment Requirement: Recommended Prerequisite:GEO 5320 and GEO 5330 and MATH 3150 and MATH 3160.
Components: Laboratory
Advanced studies in seismic wave propagation including elastodynamics, representation theory, moment tensors, effects of boundaries on propagation, asymptotic ray theory, plane wave decomposition, full wave theory (Cagniard de Hoop), and reflectivity. Synthetic seismogram formulation. Meets with GEO 7220.

GEO 6222 - Seismology II: Seismic Imaging – 3 credits                                                                            Enrollment Requirement: Prerequisite: M.S. status
Components: Laboratory/Lecture
Meets with GEO 5220. Seismic imaging using both passive and active seismic sources with applications to both large and small scale problems. Introduction to seismic tomography, receiver function analysis, refraction and reflection imaging, seismic interferometry, and other imaging techniques. Field and laboratory exercises.

GEO 6240 - Physical Fields II: Electromagnetic Methods – 3 credits (Spring only)                                            Enrollment Requirement: Prerequisites: Graduate Standing Required.
Components: Lecture
Meets with GEO 5240; additional work required of graduate students. See GEO 5240 for course description.

GEO 6250 - Inversion Theory and Applications – 3 credits (Fall only)                                                                   Enrollment Requirement: Prerequisites: Graduate Standing Required.
Components: Lecture
Meets with GEO 5250 and GEO 7250; additional work required of graduate students. See GEO 5250 for course description

GEO 6250 - Inversion Theory and Applications – 3 credits (Fall only)                                                                  Enrollment Requirement: Prerequisites: Graduate Standing Required.
Components: Lecture
Meets with GEO 5250 and GEO 7250; additional work required of graduate students. See GEO 5250 for course description.

GEO 6265 - The Magnetic Earth – 3 credits (Fall only)                                                                                                Enrollment Requirement: Prerequisites:GEO 3010 and GEO 3100.
Components: Lecture
This lecture, lab, and discussion course will introduce students to the fundamentals and applications of geomagnetism, paleomagnetism, and rock & mineral magnetism in the context of Earth System Science. Students will gain experience reading, discussing, reviewing, and presenting scientific literature, as well as writing grant proposals and data reports. The course also consists of a series of problem sets, which will be focused on a class project in which students will learn a variety of rock and paleomagnetic analytical techniques by generating their own data in the Utah Paleomagnetic Center and applying a variety of rock magnetic and paleomagnetic data reduction and synthesis techniques. The exact topic of the class project is TBD, but could include applying mineral magnetism to: magnetostratigraphy & stratigraphic correlation (in igneous, marine, and terrestrial systems); monitoring air pollution; geobiology; or paleoprecipitation records. The course is intended for graduate students and upper-level undergraduate students. It is assumed that students have completed GEO 3010 (Geophysics) and their general physics requirements. Completion of Earth Materials II, Structural Geology, or both is a bonus, but is not required.

GEO 6270 - Geomorphology – 3 credits (Fall Even Years)                                                                                          Enrollment Requirement: Prerequisites: Graduate Standing required.
Components: Lecture
Study of processes driving the dynamic form and evolution of Earths surface, focusing on the mechanics of physical and chemical interactions between ice, water, air, rock, sediment and soil. This course provides an overview of Earth surface processes and the landforms they produce. Topics include weathering and erosion, glaciers and periglacial processes, hillslopes and mass movements, earthquakes, and fluvial systems. Two lectures and one exercise period per week; one mandatory full-day field trip. Additional work required for graduate students. Meets with GEO 5270.

GEO 6320 - Signal Processing in the Geosciences – 3 credits (Fall only)                                                                Enrollment Requirement: Prerequisite: M.S. status
Components: Lecture
Analysis of linear time-invariant systems and the processing of continuous and digital signals. Topics include: Laplace transforms, Fourier Transforms, transfer functions, convolution and correlation, sampling issues, filter design, spectral analysis, and time-frequency analysis. Meets with GEO 5320, 7320.

GEO 6330 - Seismic Sources – 3 credits                                                                                                       Enrollment Requirement: Prerequisites: Graduate Standing Required.
Components: Lecture
Meets with GEO 5330 and GEO 7330; additional work required of graduate students. See GEO 5330 for course description.

GEO 6350 - Groundwater – 3 credits (Fall only)                                                                                                            Enrollment Requirement: Prerequisites: Graduate Standing Required.
Components: Lecture
Meets with GEO 5350; additional work required of graduate students. See GEO 5350 for course description.

GEO 6360 - Fluid Mechanics of Earth Materials – 3 credits (Spring Even Years)                                                  Enrollment Requirement: Prerequisites: Graduate Standing Required.
Components: Lecture
Derivation of the Navier-Stokes equations of fluid motion and momentum transport. Application to fundamental problems of Earth science and engineering design. Two lectures, one lab weekly. Meets with GEO 5360. Additional work required of graduate students.

GEO 6385 - Introduction to Groundwater Modeling – 1 credit (Spring only)                                                        Enrollment Requirement: Prerequisites: GEO 5350 OR Equivalent.
Components: Laboratory
Meets with GEO 5385. Fundamentals of groundwater flow and transport modeling will be introduced in the computer laboratory using hands-on exercises performed with the Groundwater Modeling System (GMS) and the U.S.G.S. groundwater models MODFLOW, MODPATH, and FEMWATER. By the end of the 5-week short-course, each student should understand the assumptions and limitations of the modeling approach and be able to create, run and interpret the results of 2-D groundwater flow and transport simulations using GMS. Topics covered include: defining mathematical/numerical equivalents to real world problems, finite difference method, finite element method and sensitivity studies.

GEO 6390 - Solute Transport and Subsurface Remediation – 3 credits (Spring only)                                         Enrollment Requirement: Prerequisites: GEO 5350. Co- or pre-requisite: GEO 5385. Students with groundwater courses alternative to GEO 5350/6350 may enroll with the consent of the instructor.
Components: Lecture
Meets with GEO 5390. Application of principles of ground water hydrology and contaminant chemistry in the quantification and characterization of physical, chemical and biological processes influencing subsurface hazardous waste. Topics include: quantification of advective-dispersive transport of conservative and reactive solutes, transport in granular and fractured media, application of environmental regulations and toxicological parameters, design of air-stripping, carbon adsorption, soil vapor extraction, surfactant enhanced extraction, bio-venting, bio-augmentation, solidification, and capture systems. Class project involves design of remediation system for a hypothetical site.

GEO 6420 - Vertebrate Paleontology and Evolution – 3 credits                                                           Enrollment Requirement: Prerequisite: Graduate standing required.
Components: Lecture
Meets with GEO 5420; additional work required of graduate students. See GEO 5420 for course description.

GEO 6451 - Ore Genesis and Mineral Exploration – 3 credits (Fall Odd Years)                                                     Enrollment Requirement: Prerequisite: Graduate standing required.
Components: Laboratory/Lecture
Meets with GEO 5450 and GEO 7451; additional work required of graduate students. See GEO 5450 for course description.

GEO 6470 - Stable Isotopes Biogeochemistry and Ecology – 3 credits                                               Enrollment Requirement: Prerequisite:BIOL 3410 or equivalent.
Components: Lecture
Meets with GEO 5470 and GEO 7470. A lecture course on the principles of stable isotope biogeochemistry and ecology as applied to biological environments and of the contributions of stable isotope approaches to addressing ecological phenomena from cellular through global levels. this course emphasizes a critical-thinking focus on ecological and biogeochemical processes and patterns at local to global scales. Student performance is evaluated through a combination of data analysis, writing, and oral/written communications.

GEO 6473 - Stable Isotope Ecology – 3 credits (Summer only)                                                                                  Cross-listed:GEO 7473 
Enrollment Requirement: Prerequisites:GEO 5660 OR BIOL 5495 OR BIOL 5460.
Components: Lecture
Meets with GEO 5473. Short course (2 weeks). A multi-lecturer course describing the principles of stable isotope biogeochemistry as applied to biological environments, geological and marine processes, climate reconstruction, anthropological and biomedical studies, and of the contributions of stable isotope approaches to addressing ecological phenomena from cellular through global levels.

GEO 6474 - Isotopes in Large-Scale Environmental Research – 3 credits                                      Components: Lecture
Meets with GEO 7474. This course trains students in theory and practice of techniques for integrating environmental isotopes data at large spatial scales and applying them to environmental, ecological, climate change, and hydrological research. These tools are used to identify sources, trace fluxes and movement of materials, and characterize and integrate information on environmental processes occurring over large spatial scales. Fundamentals of geospatial data, data management and Geographic Information Systems are introduced, and an interdisciplinary suite of cutting-edge research applications are presented. Offered each summer where it is open only through DCE as a contract course. Two weeks intensive.

GEO 6475 - Stable Isotope Biogeochemistry and Ecology Laboratory – 3 credits                                     Cross-listed:BIOL 7475GEO 7475 
Enrollment Requirement: Prerequisite: Instructor’s consent.
Components: Laboratory
A laboratory course in stable biogeochemistry and ecology involving experimental design, experimental methodologies, instrument use, and data analysis and interpretation. This course involves learning how to operate state-of-the-art isotope ratio mass spectrometers, cavity ring-down laser spectrometers, and associated GCMS and EA peripherals. Offered each summer where it is open only through DCE as a contract course. Two week summer intensive.

GEO 6476 - Isotopes in Large-Scale Environmental Research Laboratory – 3 credits               Components: Laboratory
Meets with GEO 7476. This lab course introduces methods for integrating environmental isotope data at large spatial scales to address environmental, ecological, climate change, and hydrological problems. A series of state-of the art laser-cased isotope analyzers, data management tools, statistical techniques, and process-based models are introduced. Students apply these tools to identify sources, trace fluxes and movement of materials, and characterize and integrate information on environmental processes occurring over large spatial scales. Offered each summer where it is open only through DCE as a contract course. Two weeks intensive.

GEO 6510 - Introduction to Petroleum Systems: PICP 1a – 1.5 credits (Fall only)                                               Enrollment Requirement: Prerequisite:GEO 3040 or equivalent.
Components: Lecture
Meets with GEO 6510. This entry level course in the Petroleum Industry Career Path (PICP), with an introduction to petroleum systems components including source, reservoir, seal, trap, and generation-migration-accumulation processes. Class discussions, presentations, and readings revolve around a required weekend field trip to investigate outcrop and subcrop expressions and field relationships of an active petroleum system (e.g., the Sevier foreland basin and overthrust belt). Industry experts and guest speakers are an integral part of the course. Projects will cover a diverse industry dataset (outcrop observations, seismic, well-log, core, bulk and organic geochemical, and outcrop data) to advise on exploration strategies in both established and frontier basins. Offered first half of fall semester.

GEO 6520 - Introduction to Petroleum Systems: PICP 1b – 1.5 credits (Fall only)                                               Enrollment Requirement: Prerequisite:GEO 6510 .
Components: Lecture
Meets with GEO 5520. A continuation of GEO 5510, this Petroleum Industry Career Path (PICP) course expands on lessons learned in PICP 1a to include a more comprehensive evaluation of hydrocarbon exploration and production methods. Industry datasets provide real-world experience with typical petroleum datasets and their associated challenges. Includes an introduction to borehole tools and well log interpretations. Integration of multidisciplinary techniques is emphasized and both conventional and unconventional resources are examined. Course includes a field trip and quest speakers from the petroleum industry. This applied course will also address business and engineering aspects of hydrocarbon exploration and production. Offered second half of fall semester, following PICP 1a.

GEO 6525 - Geologic Interpretation of Seismic Reflection Data: PICP 2a – 1.5 credits (Spring only)              Enrollment Requirement: Prerequisite: GEO 6520.
Components: Lecture
Meets with GEO 5525. This third course in the Petroleum Industry Career Path (PICP) covers the basic principles of geologic interpretation of seismic reflection data, including the basics of acquisition and processing, and potential pitfalls that all seismic interpreters should consider. Laboratory and in-class exercises will use real petroleum industry software and datasets - including both 2D paper lines and experience with 3D workstation data - and emphasize practical applications of theories introduces in class. Labs will cover integration of outcrop and well-log data with seismic data (including synthetics), mapping and contouring techniques, and fundamentals of seismic stratigraphy, all with direct implications for hydrocarbon exploration. Offered first half of spring semester.

GEO 6530 - Petroleum Systems Capstone: PICP 2b – 1.5 credits (Spring only)                                                     Enrollment Requirement: Prerequisite: GEO 6524.
Components: Lecture
Meets with GEO 5530. This course presents an open-ended petroleum exploration scenario where students must apply the methods and approaches encountered in previous PICP offerings. Industry-standard software will be used in a collaborative, team-based working environment to identify and characterize prospects from an industry dataset. Students will rely on their fundamental knowledge of geology and geophysics to generate prospects and will investigate the impact of (1) hydrocarbon in place estimation methods and other reservoir engineering concepts, (2) risk evaluation, and (3) economics, land issues and legal implications of evaluating petroleum plays and prospects. Offered second half of spring semester.

GEO 6540 - Imperial Barrel Award Competition PICP 3b – 2 credits (Spring Odd Years)                                   Enrollment Requirement: Prerequisites: GEO 6535.
Components: Lecture
Meets with GEO 5540. This course presents an open-ended petroleum exploration scenario where students must apply the methods and approaches encountered in previous PICP offerings. Industry-standard software will be used in a collaborative, team-based working environment to identify prospects from an industry dataset. Students will rely on their fundamental knowledge of geology and geophysics to generate prospects and will investigate the impact of (1) hydrocarbon in place estimation methods and other reservoir engineering concepts, (2) risk evaluation, and (3) economics, land issues and legal implications of evaluating petroleum plays and prospects. Student teams will prepare competitive technical evaluations to a panel of industry judges, focusing on participation in the American Association of Petroleum Geologists IBA.

GEO 6565 - Digital Mapping and GIS in the Geosciences – 2 credits (Fall only)                                                   Enrollment Requirement: Prerequisites: Graduate Standing Required.
Components: Lecture
Meets with GEO 5565. Introduction of coordinate systems and projections, digital elevation data and mapping. Analysis of geologic and hydrologic systems and data within a GIS context. Additional work will be required of students registered for 6565.

GEO 6660 - Geochemistry – 3 credits (Fall only)                                                                                                           Enrollment Requirement: Prerequisite: Graduate standing required.
Components: Lecture
Meets with GEO 5660 and GEO 7660; additional work required of graduate students. See GEO 5660 for course description.

GEO 6665 - Computational Paleophysiology – 3 credits                                                                                  Cross-listed:BIOL 6665
Components: Field Work
Meets with BIOL 5665 and GEO 5665. This course examines the methods scientists use to ‘put flesh on the bones’ of extinct animals. It is designed to give students the quantitative tools needed to build computational models that reconstruct the biology of extinct organisms as well as to teach them how to frame hypotheses, select appropriate methods for investigating hypotheses, analyze data, write a scientific paper, and communicate findings as an oral presentation. the class emphasizes project-based learning. The course includes a field trip and the dates are TBA. Instructor’s permission is required. Click the course name above for application information. For questions contact Biology Advising 581-6244.

GEO 6670 - Isotope Tracers in Earth Science – 3 credits (Fall Even Years)                                                             Enrollment Requirement: Prerequisite: Graduate standing required.
Components: Lecture/Discussion
Meets with GEO 5670; additional work required of graduate students. See GEO 5670 for course description.

GEO 6675 - Paleoclimate Reconstruction – 3 credits                                                                          Components: Lecture
Meets with GEO 5675. Paleoclimatology, the study of past climate states and climate change, is fundamental to understanding and predicting recent and future changes in Earth’s climate. This course will explore how paleoclimatologists reconstruct and understand past climate through the investigation of biological, hydrological, and sedimentalogical archives. The course combines lectures with reading and discussion of the recent literature, and will emphasize informed, critical evaluation of paleoclimate data and illustration of multi-disciplinary approaches to significant problems in contemporary paleoclimatology. Although no formal prerequisites are required, introductory-level familiarity with inorganic and organic chemistry, biology, and calculus will benefit students in the class.

GEO 6680 - The Carbon Cycle: Past, Present, Future – 3 credits                                                      Components: Lecture
Meets with GEO 5680. This course will review the carbon cycle in the context of its global role as a fundamental biogeochemical cycle. We will explore its links to Earth history, evolution, climate, surface processes, the sedimentary record, oceanography, ecology, energy, human society, and the future habitability of our planet. We will evaluate how the carbon cycle operated before human intervention, how it has changed in recent centuries, and how it might change in the future.

GEO 6690 – Environmental Chemodynamics – 3 credits (Fall only)                                                                        Enrollment Requirement: Prerequisites:CHEM 1210, CHEM 1220 or consent of instructor.
Components: Lecture
Graduate Standing required. Thermodynamic and transport properties of inorganic and organic aqueous solutes in applied contexts involving contaminant accumulation and transport. Mineral solubilities, phase equilibria, redox processes, heterogenous kinetics, and irreversible mass transfer are examined via theory and hands-on geochemical modeling to support engineered solutions to contamination problems. Meets with GEO 5690.

GEO 6920 - Special Topics - .5-5 credits (All Semesters)                                                                                             Total Completions Allowed: 8 Total Units Allowed: 24
Components: Special Topics
Upon graduate student request, special seminars may be taught by the following faculty in the areas of indicated specialization: J.M. Bartley, structural geology; J.R. Bowman, isotope geology and metamorphic petrology; F.H. Brown, geochronology and petrology; R.L. Bruhn, structural and engineering geology; T.E. Cerling, geochemistry; M.A. Chan, sedimentology and stratigraphy; D.S. Chapman, heat flow and regional tectonics; A.A. Ekdale, invertebrate paleontology and paleoecology; S.L. Halgedahl, rock magnetism; R.D. Jarrard, downhole, geophysical measurements; P.W. Jewell, hydrology and fluid dynamics; C. Johnson, sedimentology, tectonics; W.P. Johnson, geological engineering; B.P. Nash, igneous petrology, volcanology; J.C. Pechmann, earthquake seismology; E.U. Petersen, economic geology; P.H. Roth, micropaleontology and paleoceanography; G.T. Schuster, reflection seismology; R.B. Smith, seismology and tectonophysics; D.K. Solomon, geological engineering, hydrology; F. Tonon, geological engineering, uncertainty modeling; M.S. Zhdanov, geophysical field theory.

GEO 6950 - Reviews in Earth Science – 3 credits (Fall only)                                                                                   Components: Lecture
Review of selected topics encompassing a broad spectrum of disciplines within Earth science. Seminar format emphasizes developing communications skills, teamwork, and collegiality. Required for all students in first year of M.S. programs in Department of Geology and Geophysics. One two-hour meeting weekly.

GEO 6960 - Masters of Engineering Special Project – 1-6 credits                                                                     Total Completions Allowed: 2 Total Units Allowed: 12
Components: Special Projects
Research for Masters of Engineering Project

GEO 6970 - Thesis Research: Master’s – 1-12 credits (All Semesters)                                                                      Total Completions Allowed: 1 Total Units Allowed: 99
Components: Thesis Research
Also appropriate for M.E. research.

GEO 6980 - Faculty Consultation – 3 credits (All Semesters)                                                                             Components: Independent Study

GEO 7120 - Geochemical Thermodynamics and Transport – 3 credits (Fall Odd Years)                                    Enrollment Requirement: Prerequisite: Graduate Standing Required.
Components: Laboratory/Lecture
Meets with GEO 5120 and GEO 6120; additional work required of graduate students. See GEO 5120 for course description.

GEO 7200 - Depositional Environments – 3 credits (Spring Even Years)                                                                Cross-listed: GEO 6200
Enrollment Requirement: Prerequisites: Ph.D. Students AND Graduate Standing Required.
Components: Lecture
Graduate standing required. Meets with GEO 5200; additional work required of graduate students. Physical and chemical factors related to deposition and lithification of sedimentary material; significant aspects of major sedimentary environments, with emphasis on interpretation and recognition. Three lectures weekly.

GEO 7220 - Theoretical Seismology – 3 credits (Spring only)
Enrollment Requirement: Prerequisite:
Ph.D. students only.
Components: Lecture
Meets with GEO 6220; additional work required of graduate students. See GEO 6220 for course description.

GEO 7320 - Signal Processing in the Geosciences – 3 credits (Fall only)                                                                Enrollment Requirement: Prerequisites: PhD Students Only.
Components: Lecture
Analysis of linear time-invariant systems and the processing of continuous and digital signals. Topics include: Laplace transforms, Fourier Transforms, transfer functions, convolution and correlation, sampling issues, filter design, spectral analysis, and time-frequency analysis. Meets with GEO 5320, 6320.

GEO 7390 - Solute Transport and Subsurface Remediation – 3 credits (Spring only)                                         Enrollment Requirement: Prerequisites:GEO 3080, GEO 3090, GEO 3400, GEO 5350, GEO 5360, GEO 5370. Co- or pre-requisite:GEO 5385, GEO 5500. Non Geological Engineers lacking some of these pre-requisites may enroll with the consent of the instructor.
Components: Lecture
Application of principles of ground water hydrology and contaminant chemistry in the quantification and characterization of physical, chemical and biological processes influencing subsurface hazardous waste. Topics include: quantification of advective-dispersive transport of conservative and reactive solutes, transport in granular and fractured media, application of environmental regulations and toxicological parameters, design of air-stripping, carbon adsorption, soil vapor extraction, surfactant enhanced extraction, bio-venting, bio-augmentation, solidification, and capture systems. Class project involves design of remediation system for a hypothetical site.

GEO 7470 - Stable Isotopes Biogeochemistry and Ecology – 3 credits                                               Enrollment Requirement: Prerequisite: PhD standing or instructor’s consent.
Components: Laboratory
Meets with GEO 5470 and GEO 6470. A lecture course on the principles of stable isotope biogeochemistry and ecology as applied to biological environments and of the contributions of stable isotope approaches to addressing ecological phenomena from cellular through global levels. this course emphasizes a critical-thinking focus on ecological and biogeochemical processes and patterns at local to global scales. Student performance is evaluated through a combination of data analysis, writing, and oral/written communications.

GEO 7473 - Stable Isotope Ecology – 3 credits (Summer only)                                                                                  Cross-listed:GEO 6473 
Enrollment Requirement: Prerequisites:GEO 5660 OR BIOL 5495 OR BIOL 5460.
Components: Lecture
Meets with GEO 5473. Short course (2 weeks). A multi-lecturer course describing the principles of stable isotope biogeochemistry as applied to biological environments, geological and marine processes, climate reconstruction, anthropological and biomedical studies, and of the contributions of stable isotope approaches to addressing ecological phenomena from cellular through global levels.

GEO 7474 - Isotopes in Large-Scale Environmental Research – 3 credits                                      Components: Lecture
Meets with GEO 6474. This course trains students in theory and practice of techniques for integrating environmental isotopes data at large spatial scales and applying them to environmental, ecological, climate change, and hydrological research. These tools are used to identify sources, trace fluxes and movement of materials, and characterize and integrate information on environmental processes occurring over large spatial scales. Fundamentals of geospatial data, data management and Geographic Information Systems are introduced, and an interdisciplinary suite of cutting-edge research applications are presented. Offered each summer where it is open only through DCE as a contract course. Two weeks intensive.

GEO 7475 - Stable Isotope Biogeochemistry and Ecology Laboratory – 3 credits                                     Cross-listed: BIOL 7475GEO 6475 
Components: Laboratory
A laboratory course in stable biogeochemistry and ecology involving experimental design, experimental methodologies, instrument use, and data analysis and interpretation. This course involves learning how to operate state-of-the-art isotope ratio mass spectrometers, cavity ring-down laser spectrometers, and associated GCMS and EA peripherals. Offered each summer where it is open only through DCE as a contract course. Two week summer intensive.

GEO 7476 - Isotopes in Large-Scale Environmental Research – 3 credits                                      Components: Laboratory
Meets with GEO 6476. This lab course introduces methods for integrating environmental isotope data at large spatial scales to address environmental, ecological, climate change, and hydrological problems. A series of state-of the art laser-cased isotope analyzers, data management tools, statistical techniques, and process-based models are introduced. Students apply these tools to identify sources, trace fluxes and movement of materials, and characterize and integrate information on environmental processes occurring over large spatial scales. Offered each summer where it is open only through DCE as a contract course. Two weeks intensive.

GEO 7480 - Landslides and Slope Stability – 3 credits                                                                         Components: Lecture
Topics covered in this course: principles, definitions, triggering mechanisms and processes of landslides, influence of geological history and uncertainties in soil strength parameters, deterministic and probabilistic approaches in landslide hazard assessment, back analysis of slope failures, linear and non linear failure envelopes in slope stability analysis, seismic aspects of slope stability, earthquake-induced catastrophic landslides in liquefiable soils, rainfall-induced shallow landslides on steep slopes, field instrumentation, remedial measures, case studies.

GEO 7920 - Special Topics – 1-3 credits (All Semesters)                                                                                              Total Completions Allowed: 8 Total Units Allowed: 24
Enrollment Requirement: Prerequisite: Ph.D. students only.
Components: Special Topics
Topics determined by faculty each semester.

GEO 7970 - Thesis Research: Ph.D. – 1-12 credits (All Semesters)                                                                         Components: Thesis Research

GEO 7980 - Faculty Consultation – 3 credits (All Semesters)                                                                                  Components: Independent Study

GEO 7990 - Continuing Registration: Ph.D. – 0 credits (All Semesters)                                                                 Components: Continuing Registration

 

Last Updated: 10/23/18